Borrower FAQs

Yes, to the Central Statistics Office (CSO). The Statistics Act 1993 provides that the CSO may obtain information from public bodies including the Central Bank. Such transfers of information are also permitted under data protection law. A Data Protection Impact Assessment (DPIA) was performed in advance of this transfer.

The CSO is Ireland's national statistical office and its purpose is to impartially collect, analyse and make available statistics about Ireland’s people, society and economy. More information is available at www.cso.ie.

Personal data held on the Central Credit Register includes your name, date of birth, address, gender, telephone number and personal public service number (PPSN). Your PPSN, Eircode and contact telephone number is not transferred to the CSO.

Credit data held on the Central Credit Register includes the loan type, such as mortgage, credit card, overdraft, personal loan, business loan, HP, PCP etc; the amount borrowed and the amount outstanding.

The Central Bank is the data controller for the Central Credit Register and the obligations of the General Data Protection Directive and Data Protection law apply.

The CSO is the data controller for the information when it is transferred and the obligations of the General Data Protection Directive and Data Protection law apply then to the CSO.

The CSO will use the information for statistical purposes and reporting only. No details that might be related to an identifiable person may be divulged to any other government department or body.

A Memorandum of Understanding is in place between the Central Bank and the CSO regarding the governance and use of the data and is available on our Uses of CCR Data Page in the Publications area.

No. Data contained on your credit report is not affected by this transfer. Lenders have been advised that some of the data they provide to the Central Credit Register in respect of loans is now being shared with the Central Statistics Office (CSO).

The Central Bank is the data controller for the Central Credit Register and the obligations of the GDPR and general and data protection law apply.

The CSO is the data controller for the information when it is transferred and the obligations of the General Data Protection Direct and Data Protection law apply then to the CSO.

Any decision in relation to your loan applications in the future is a matter for your lender to assess based on the information available to them at the time, including your credit report and other sources such as information on your income, assets etc.

Your lender is responsible for the accuracy of the data that they send to the Central Credit Register. While it is in their possession, they are a data controller under Data Protection law. 

Once the data is received by the Central Credit Register the Central Bank of Ireland becomes the data controller.

If you believe some of your data is inaccurate, incomplete or not up date on your credit report, you have a right to request that the data be amended. Follow the instructions in our factsheet 'how to request an amendment to my information' available on our publications page here or start your online application to amend your information here.

If you have applied to amend your information, we will try to resolve the issue as soon as possible. If we need to contact your lender or seek further information from you, this will extend the time needed.

We will respond within 20 days, and may extend the period to 40 days before getting back to you with a decision. You must complete an application and provide information to support your request together with your identification documents before we can proceed. You can start your online application here.

Yes. The Credit Reporting Act 2013 and the Regulations provide the legal basis for the collection and processing of personal information, including PPSNs. In addition, the Central Bank of Ireland consulted with the Office of the Data Protection Commissioner in advance of publishing the Regulations.

Each time you or a lender accesses your credit report, a footprint is created. A footprint is a record of the date, the lender name (or CIS enquiry if it's you), and the reason why that particular lender sought your credit report.

The footprint is shown at the end of the report for a period of five years after a lender last requested access.

A footprint looks like this:

Credit Information Provider Name Enquiry Date Function Purpose
ABC Bank 12/11/2020 New Credit Application New Credit Application
DEF Bank 01/03/2020 Monitoring Enquiry Restructure
GHI Finance 10/12/2019 Monitoring Enquiry Breach of Terms
JKL Credit Union 15/05/2019 New Credit Application New Credit Application

 

Information submitted by your lender(s) each month is used to create a credit report which is stored on the Central Credit Register. This information will be released only when a lender or the borrower to whom the information relates requests access; if the borrower to whom the information relates, consents to the release of this information to another person;
as provided by the Credit Reporting Act 2013, the Data Protection Act 2018 or as required or permitted by law or any other applicable legislation.

The Central Bank may also transfer information to state agencies and law enforcement bodies when it is considered necessary and proportionate to do so.

The Central Credit Register supports the Central Bank’s obligations and functions, including consumer protection, supervising the financial sector and ensuring financial stability. The Central Bank may use any pseudonymised information held on the Central Credit Register in the performance of any of its functions.

For more information see our data protection statement here.

We need you to prove your identity to proceed with your application. This ensures that your data protection rights are upheld.

The Credit Reporting Act 2013 and the Regulations provide the legal basis for the collection and processing of personal information, including PPSNs. The Central Bank of Ireland consulted with the Office of the Data Protection Commissioner in advance of publishing these Regulations as provided for in the Act. As with all personal information provided to the Central Credit Register when making a request this will be used to locate your credit report.

Information on borrowers such consumers, individuals, sole traders, companies and any other entities that are resident in the State at the time of making the credit application, or where the credit agreement is governed by Irish law, are included on the Central Credit Register.

This information includes personal information such as name, date of birth, address(es), PPSN, gender and contact details, and credit information such as the type of loan you have, the amount borrowed, the name of the lender and the payment performance.

In time, it will also include guarantors who provide guarantees or indemnities in respect of credit agreements.

You can see a sample credit report on our publications page here.

  • Asset finance houses
  • Banks
  • Credit Unions
  • Firms that have acquired loan books from Irish financial institutions
  • Licensed moneylenders
  • Local authorities
  • NAMA
From 30 June 2017  From 31 March 2018 From 30 June 2019
Credit cards Business loans Hire purchase
Mortgages Local authority loans PCPs
Overdrafts Licensed moneylenders Asset finance
Personal loans    

 

No information on bankruptcy, or OTHER personal insolvency arrangements is contained on the Central Credit Register. If the bankruptcy or insolvency process resulted in a loan being written off, the lender will most likely report than loan as “written off”. Information on this loan will remain on your credit report in line with our retention periods. If the process did not result in loan(s) being written off by a lender, then it may be correct for the lender to continue to report the loan(s) as an active loan to the Central Credit Register.

So, while it may not be possible for the lender to pursue you for repayment of a loan following your discharge from bankruptcy or any other personal insolvency arrangement, lenders may still be obliged to submit information to the Central Credit Register for that loan.

You can read more about retention periods here.

You may wish to take separate legal advice on this matter or refer to the Insolvency Service of Ireland for further information at www.isi.gov.ie.

If you wish to apply for your credit report or place an Explanatory Statement on your credit report in connection with the matter, you can do this here.

Under the Credit Reporting Act 2013, lenders are obliged to submit credit and personal information on loans of €500 or more where the loan is still active. In other words, where payments are being made, or expected to be made, by the lender.

Credit information includes positive credit information, for example that a payment has been made; and negative credit information, for example that a payment has not been made.  This information is submitted by your lender in order to build your credit history and create your credit report.

In addition, they are obliged to report the credit status of each loan. The credit status will indicate for example, if there has been any legal action taken, an overdraft cancelled, or a credit card revoked. It will also indicate if there has been a settlement or write-off of a debt. Finally it will also record if there has been a repossession or voluntary surrender of an asset. If none of the above apply, this is marked ‘n/a’.

While it may be possible that a lender is statute barred from pursuing a borrower for repayment of a loan, the passage of time does not erase the actual debt, and the loan may still be reported to the Central Credit Register.

No items found.